Birding Factoids

1,221 species
in 75 families

38 endemic species plus 
10 shared only with Tibet
110+ speciality species
96 endangered species
2 week trip expectation -
about 230-240 species 

    China
    Hotspots
Checklist of Chinese BirdsTours and GuidesEco-LodgesSpeciality BirdsMap and General InformationWeather and Best Birding TimesPrint Resources

Check out some of the Rare Birds in China
....

China's
Specialities
(Pause your cursor on the photo to see the species name.)
Red-crowned Crane - ENDANGERED - Photo copyright Tony Coatsworth
Photo copyright Tony Coatsworth
...
Crested Ibis - ENDANGERED - Photo courtesy of the Japanese Society for Preservation of Birds
Photo courtesy of the Japanese Society for Preservation of Birds
...
Mandarin Duck - Photo copyright Tina MacDonald
Photo by Tina MacDonald
...
Tawny Fish-Owl - Photo copyright C. C. Chang
Photo copyright C. C. Chang
...
Richard's Pipit - Photo copyright Laurence Poh
Photo copyright Laurence Poh
...
Red-billed Leiothrix - Photo copyright Peter LaTourrette
Photo copyright Peter LaTourrette
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Reeves's Pheasant - Photo copyright Dan Cowell
Photo copyright Dan Cowell
...
Maroon Oriole - Photo copyright C. C. Chang
Photo copyright C. C. Chang
...
Stripe-throated Bulbul - Photo copyright Laurence Poh
Photo copyright Laurence Poh
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Black-tailed Gull - Photo copyright Peter Weber
Photo copyright Peter Weber
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Temminck's Tragopan - Photo copyright Dan Cowell
Photo copyright Dan Cowell
...
Mountain Bulbul - photo copyright Laurence Poh
Photo copyright Laurence Poh
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Chinese Pond-Heron - Photo copyright Nick Lowton
Photo copyright Nick Lowton
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Great Bittern - Photo copyright Jeff Blincow
Photo copyright Jeff Blincow
...
Oriental Turtle-dove - Photo copyright Tony Coatsworth
Photo copyright Tony Coatsworth
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White Eared-Pheasant - Photo copyright Tragopan Pheasantry, Belgium
Photo copyright Tragopan Pheasantry, Belgium
...
Oriental Pratincole - Photo copyright Laurence Poh
Photo copyright Laurence Poh
....
Greater Coucal - Photo copyright Dave Behrens
Photo copyright Dave Behrens
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River Lapwing - Photo copyright Ronald Saldino
Photo copyright Ronald Saldino
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Mongolian Ground-Jay - Photo copyright Vaughan Ashby
Photo copyright Vaughan Ashby
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Chinese Penduline-Tit - Photo copyright Kim Hyun-Tae
Photo copyright Kim Hyun-Tae
...
Scaly-breasted Munia - Photo copyright Laurence Poh
Photo copyright Laurence Poh
...
Malayan Night-Heron - Photo copyright C. C. Chang
Photo copyright C. C. Chang
...
     
    ...
    ....Migration Hub of the Orient: Beidaihe, China - by Martin Williams. 
      Beidaihe now ranks as the place to see east Asian migrants. The town checklist currently runs to some 389 species; over 300 of these may be seen in a year, only perhaps 14 occurring year-round--the rest are at least partial migrants. The diversity stems chiefly from Beidaihe's location (map). Lying 280 kilometres east of Beijing, Beidaihe is on the edge of the Bay of Bohai, the northernmost extent of the East China Sea. Several flyways converge in the area, linking winter haunts in southern China, Australia, Thailand and even--for Amur Falcon--south-east Africa, and breeding grounds ranging from north-east China to arctic Russia. See also the checklist of Beidaihe birds.
    ...
    ....The Annotated Ramsar List: China - China presently has 7 sites 
      (one in Hong Kong) designated as Wetlands of International Importance, with a surface area of 588,380 hectares. Brief information is available on: 
      • Dongdongtinghu, Hunan province
      • Dongzhaigang, Hainan province
      • Niaodao ("Bird Island"), Qinghai province
      • Poyanghu, Jiangxi province
      • Xianghai, Jilin province
      • Zhalong, Heilongjiang province
    ...
    ....Overwintering sites for China's Birds - from the China Birding 
      website. The wide areas on the south of valleys of the Huaihe River and Yangtze River are the major overwintering sites for migratory birds of Northeast Asia. Influenced by marine monsoon, the various coastal provinces on the south of Liaoning Province are not as rigorous as inlands of Chinese mainland in climatic conditions. Therefore, they are the overwintering sites for many species of Passeriformes and some raptor species feeding on plant seeds, such as Asio flammeus. For waterfowls and wading birds, the principle parts of overwintering birds, the freezeup of surfaces of lakes and rivers and covering with ice and snow on the ground are restricted factors for overwintering, inhabiting and survival. So they can only gather towards water areas in warm region, forming a grand view of thousands of birds. 
    ...
    ....Poyang Lake, and the Status of Chinese Wetlands - this website
      provides information on Lake Poyang, site of the breeding grounds of the endangered Siberian Crane.
    ...
    ....Wuyishan National Key Nature Reserve - It is the single biggest and
      the most comprehensive surviving semi-subtropical forest system in the south-east mainland China.
    ...
    ....Wanglang Nature Reserve, Sichuan Province, China - Visitor 
      Information. Located in northern Sichuan Province, Wanglang's most famous resident is the Giant Panda, but it also has a rich variety of bird life. Expect to see forest and alpine birds, such as babblers, laughingthrushes, rosefinches, accentors, tits, lammergeier, minivets, woodpeckers, corvids, etc. Of special interest: Sichuan Wood Owl, White-Cheeked Laughingthrush and a number of pheasants including the Blue Eared Pheasant.
    ...
    ....Dongdongtinghu (East Dongting Lake) - Dongdongtinghu is 
      situated in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River in northern Hunan Province of the People's Republic of China. It is a typical freshwater lake wetland in a transitional area between the middle and northern sub-tropical climatic zones. It is one of China's six wetlands which have been designated as Ramsar sites. 
    ...
    ....China - Directory of Wetlands of International Importance
      includes information on all China's Ramsar designated sites, including:
      • Xianghai
      • Zhalong
      • Po Yang Hu
      • Dong Dong Ting Hu
      • Niaodao
      • Dong Zhai Gang
    ...
    ....Yellow River Delta National Nature Reserve (YRDNNR) - The Yellow
      River Delta National Nature Reserve is a wetland reserve to protect the natural wetland system of the Yellow River Estuary and the rare and endangered wildlife inhabiting in it. Because of its specific location and typical ecological system, the YRDNNR possesses a mostly original, the broadest and youngest wetland ecological system in warm-temperate zone of China, and it becomes an important site for breeding, wintering and roosting to the migratory birds migrating along the western Pacific coastline.
    ...
    ....China Filming Trip Highlights - by David Gosney. An illustrated report ...
    ....Birds seen in Western Yunnan, China - by Jesper Hornskov. This
      downloadable report (Word format) is an annotated list that summarizes observations of birds made in the course of roughly five months in Yunnan Province, China, during 14-26 Jan 1988, late December 1994 to mid-February 1995, March-April 1996, and March-April 1999. While Lijiang has received considerable attention from travelling birdwatchers since the mid-1980's, the areas further west (and Zhongdian, to the north) have only been "open" since early 1992.
    ...
    ....Happy Island and Beidaihe Bird Report: August 28 - September 9, 
      1994 - by Jochen Dierschke & Felix Heintzenberg. Beidaihe is one of the best known birding hotspots in the Far East, where every spring and autumn many of the Asiatic migrants can be seen in good numbers. Just south of Beidaihe, there is another important spot, named "Happy Island (chinese: Kai Le Dao), which seems to be even better for birding than Beidaihe. Surprisingly few birders have visited this island for more than one day, but this is maybe due to the lack of comfortable accomodation there. 
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Hong Kong, Macao, Guangxi and Guizhou (P.R. China),
      October 1996, by Jim Turner and Kate Trainer. China locations are difficult to reach, except by chosing a general itinerary that includes as many small cities as possible. Rural visits are problematic, owing to the lack of tourist infrastructure, but smallish cities afford easy walks from the city to surrounding rural land, where we found an unexpected population and variety of birds. Rural Chinese are friendly and not at all suspicious of strangers in their rice paddies. 
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Several Trips: Adventures in Chinese Birding, by 
      Stanley (Skip) Almoney. 1996 - 1999. Over the last five years, I have had the opportunity to visit various parts of China on business. While on these trips I was able to find time to bird watch in a variety of locations. Most of my bird watching was done during free time, and often I was traveling with non-birders who did not have the patience to stop and wait for a bird to show itself. Only one trip, to Emei Mountain in September 1999, was really planned as a birding trip. This is a description of some of my experiences trying to bird watch in China.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: China and Beidaihe - May, 1997 - by Robert Wincup.
      Saturday May 3 1997 was the most eagerly awaited day of the year for me. Why? I hear those of you who donít live in Lowestoft ask. Well, it was the day I left with the other members of the Wild Wings tour for the spring migration spectacular at Beidaihe on the east coast of China. The trip exceeded all of my expectations. The food wasnít bad and the Chinese people were very friendly. I had managed a total of 203 species, 115 of which were lifers.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Shanghai and Chengdu (China), June 2-11, 1997 - by 
      Michael Houle ("Novice Birder"). Shanghai is very modern, has good roads, and bike paths, but people drive everywhere. Crossing the street is pure possession. Just aim and do not stop. Bikers, taxis, buses, and all coming from every direction, will brush past but will not run you over, unless you panic and stop. Everyone aims and goes. See also Michael's October 1997 Northeast China Trip Report.
    ...
    ....Ten Million Sparrows Canít Be Wrong - A Brief Visit to Beijing
      November 1997 by Keith Martin. The idea of this report is to give birders (and maybe even normal people!) visiting Beijing an idea of what they might see during a short visit to the captivating capital of China. I visited Beijing from the 9th to the 20th of November 1997 to attend an academic conference, spending the last five days "having a look around", with a bit of opportunistic birding thrown in. I had great trouble getting useful advance information about the birds of Beijing and hence I hope this informal report will be of some interest to anyone else visiting the capital under similar conditions. There is a bit more than bird information in here, so I hope you can extract something useful from the ramblings.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: China. This trip report is provided courtesy of Urs
      Geiser's Trip Report Archive.  April 23 - May 16, 1998 - by Richard D. Palmer. Perhaps some of you may have wondered what it would be like to go to China on a non-birding sightseeing trip. What kind of birds might one see when you could steal a few moments to do some birding? My wife and I and 36 other non-birding participants recently completed just such a trip... and we now have many wonderful memories of the country and its people. 
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Happy Island, China by Stefan Cherrug. 
      We were seven Swedes that made a birding travel to Happy Island, China 5th-21st May 1998. The island is situated in the Bo Hai Bay in the Yellow Sea in Hopeh about 250 km E of Beijing. A total of 208 species were seen.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: China, July 24 - September 3, 1998, by Jerzy 
      Dyczkowski. I travelled with three friends around China for six weeks. The main purpose was the "cultural" sights, and birding was usually considered secondary. Nevertheless, sometimes the birds took over - in Emei Shan and Putuoshan, for example. Since we visited no major reserve or bird hotspot, this report can be of use for a person coming to China for general tourist or business purposes and birding on spare time. 
    ...
    ....China Trip Report - Beidaihe and Happy Island: August/September
      1999 - by Jan Ole Kriegs and Thomas Sacher. In August/September 1999 we went on a trip to Beidaihe and Happy Island (Chinese: Kai Le Dao; both in province Hebei). We first stayed for some days in Beijing and afterwards went to Beidaihe, where we were able to organise our four-week-stay on Happy Island.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Beidaihe (P.R. China). This trip report is provided 
      courtesy of Urs Geiser's Trip Report Archive.  August 22 - September 3, 1999 - by Gerd Rotzoll. This birding trip was undertaken after attending a conference in Beijing. Therefore the timing could not be freely chosen and turned out to be somewhat too early for much of the passerine migration. Nevertheless, shorebird migration was in full swing, and a lot of other interesting birds were seen, too. 
    ...
    ....Trip Report: China. This trip report is provided courtesy of Urs 
      Geiser's Trip Report Archive.  July 24 - September 3, 1998 by Jerzy 
      Dyczkowski. I travelled with three friends around China for six weeks. The main purpose was the "cultural" sights, and birding was usually considered secondary. Nevertheless, sometimes the birds took over - in Emei Shan and Putuoshan, for example. Since we visited no major reserve or bird hotspot, this report can be of use for a person coming to China for general tourist or business purposes and birding on spare time. 
    ...
    ....Opportunistic birding in Xinjiang Province, China - by Steve Clark. 
      In July-August 1998 I was fortunate to be invited to visit Xinjiang Province in far north-west China as part of an agricultural exchange. While I realised there would be limited opportunity for birding, it was my first visit to the northern hemisphere and I spent much time beforehand studying what birds I might see. My base was the capital city of Urumqi (pronounced Wooloomoochi) which is famous for being the most remote city from any ocean.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Happy Island & Beidaihe, China, 1-22 May 1999 by 
      Jesper Hornskov. This report covers a birdwatching trip to E Asia's foremost migration hotspot.
    ...
    ....Trip Report - NE Tibet: 29 May - 25 June 1999 by Jesper  Hornskov.
      This report covers the birds seen on a journey in Qinghai Province, China, by R. Ferguson, A. Lamont, J.E. Richardson, T. & F. Serck-Hanssen, B. Soderlund & myself during late spring/ early summer 1999. (NOTE: this is a downloadable report in WORD format from the Danish Ornithological Society´s website). We assembled in Beijing, China's capital, in the course of 29th, and managed a bit of birdwatching during visits to the Summer Palace and to the gardens of hospital near our hotel. The next morning we flew to Lanzhou, Gansu, where our drivers were waiting with the 4WDs, and we were soon in Xining, Qinghai.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: China and Hong Kong. This trip report is provided 
      courtesy of Urs Geiser's Trip Report Archive.  July 1999 by Bill Pratt. Although I still have not identified two of the birds I saw in China, I think the time has come for me to report on what was an unusually gratifying experience in a country that some say has few birds. What I learned from my experience is that the birds are there but you have to look for them; possibly they are more wary of being killed and eaten in China, since every conceivable kind of meat is on a Chinese menu, especially duck, but in any case there are many birds in China I'm happy to say and they are mostly new species to Westerners. 
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Po Yang (Jiangxi Province), P.R.China, December 21-24,
      2000, by Graham Talbot. Po Yang in Jiangxi Province is a huge lake surrounded by a number of smaller lakes. In the summer the lakes are filled by the flooding of the Jangzi River, however in the autumn as the waters subside vast areas of shallow water and extensive muddy banks are created producing ideal habitat for cranes ducks and geese. The area is the main wintering ground for 95% of the worlds Siberian Crane population as well as a major wintering ground for White-naped and Hooded Cranes.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Beidaihe-Shanghai - April, May, 2001. By Koji Tagi.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Western China and Northeast Tibet - 21 May to
      16 July 2000. By Jon Hornbuckle. I had long wanted to visit Tibet but the idea only became reality when I met Janos Olah junior and senior in NE India in March 1998. They were planning to go and so I agreed to contact Jesper Hornskov whom I knew lived in China and organised tours to Tibet. He proposed a 4-week tour of Qinghai in June for 6 people and I booked him for 2000. The Olahs had to drop out due to high demand for their tours in Hungary but I was able to recruit excellent replacements via Oriental Birding. Three of us were fortunate in having the time to do western Sichuan first.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Winter birding in eastern and south-western China
      (Shanghai, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Guizhou, and Yunnan), December 22nd 2001 - 7th January 2002. By Steve Bale. Final trip list = 218 species.  But I am confident that sooner or later we will get to 220 - it is only a matter of time before some Yunnan-occurring 'subspecies' are found to warrant species status! But, at the end of the day, who cares if there's a subtle difference in DNA  that makes a bird a Bianchi's Warbler as opposed to something else. What is important, however, is the size of the wintering-population of cranes, geese, storks, and other waterbirds that depend on the Chinese bird reserves; and the numerous other birds populations in China that rely on undisturbed mountain forests.  Because those numbers are the only numbers that matter. 
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Beidahe - December 1-2, 2002. By Jesper Hornskov 
      and Jan Kiel. As an add-on to a business visit to Tianjian, JK travelled up to Beidaihe by train. The journey takes c3 hours as it does from Beijing; alternatively Beidaihe can be reached conveniently from both cities by car or public express bus also in c3 hours, and we believe our list would recommend a similar adventure to anyone visiting N China under similar circumstances...
    ...
    ....Trip Report: China - Dinghu San (Guang Dong province), 
      4-5 April 2005. By Mike Waite. During a short birding trip to Hong Kong earlier this year, I was determined to squeeze in a few days on mainland China. The original plan was to visit Ba Bao Shan (north of Shaoguan), however this proved logistically impossible due to Labour Week public holidays. So; where to go with only a couple of days on the edge of this vast country? My hosts at Mai Po marshes suggested the national nature reserve (Chinaís first) at Dinghu Mountain, 18 kms northeast of the city of Zhao Qing in western Guang Dong province. The site occupies several forested limestone hills and is billed very much as a country retreat serving the nearby city. It therefore attracts a lot of visitors, especially at weekends and holidays. Nevertheless, the mixed forest here supports a fair range of the typical lowland and foothill birds of southeast China.
    ...
    ....Trip Report: Birding China, by Steve Bale. Baihuashan is in the
      Mentougou district of Beijing Municipality, and lies approximately 110km west of central Beijing. The area, which borders Hebei Province, contains the 3rd highest peak in Beijing, Baicaopan at 2050m, as well as Baihuashan  (literally 100 flowers mountain) at 1991m. Unlike other mountainous areas in Beijing, even these highest peaks are accessible to non-mountaineers and can be reached with relative ease along ridge walks. The area is scenically attractive with a variety of habitat, including larch forests, alpine meadows, widespread deciduous cover, extensive areas of scrub and rocky slopes. There are more than 1100 plant and 170 animal species, including - according to the literature at least - 'leopard' and, of particular interest to birders if it were confirmed, 'brown-eared pheasant'. 
    ...
    ....Additional Trip reports from China Birding - a number of commercial
      trip itineraries are available from this excellent website which are useful to review if you are planning a birding trip to China, including:
      • Sichuan Province 28 days Birding Report 
      • Chengdu Emei Chengdu Birding Report
      • Beijing Xining Beijing Birding Itinerary
      • Beijing-Qinghai-Tibet-beijing Itinerary
      • Tibet Namtso Reting Monastery Birding Information
      • Beijing-Qinghai Short Birding Trip Itinerary
      • Birding report of Kunming and Banna
      • Birding report of Qinghai
      • Full birding report of Sichuan by 1995
      • Sichuan Birds Information
      • Qinghai Tibet Plateau Birds Information

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Tours and Guides

See DISCLAIMER


birdingpal.com...>> A Birding Pal is not a paid guide, but someone who likes to help out of town visitors. You can become a Birding Pal today! Help someone to enjoy your local birding spots and find a pal to help you when you travel. Click here for Chinese Birding Pals, or join to be a Birding Pal!
Saunder's Gull - ENDANGERED - Photo copyright Eric Toorman
Photo copyright Eric Toorman

Black-browed Barbet - Photo copyright C. C. Chang

Photo copyright C. C. Chang

Black-capped Kingfisher - Photo copyright Karl Ng

Photo copyright Karl Ng

Oriental Reed-Warbler - Photo copyright Christian Artuso

Photo copyright Christian Artuso
    **..Birding in China and Tibet - with Birdfinding Holidays. July 2 - 17, 
      2003. On this tour we will explore the remote Qinghai province in the north-east corner of the Tibetan plateau. This high-altitude region holds some very special, almost mythical, species like Roborowskii's Rosefinch, Tibetan Sandgrouse, Mongolian Ground-jay, Chinese Grouse and an impressive array of larks, rosefinches, snowfinches, leaf warblers and redstarts. It is possible to see around 200 species on this trip. Your guide has spent over a year in the field in China and this will be his sixth visit to the Qinghai area.
    ...
    **..Classic China: Sichuan with Victor Emmanuel Nature Tours (VENT) -
      This tour is the first VENT has hosted to China at this time of year, and we shall explore some of the finest wetlands China has to offer. By way of contrast, we will also visit two interesting forest reserves which will provide insight into a wealth of species to be found in China's eastern forests. This is a tour of seemingly unending superlatives. 
      • May 10 - May 29, 2004 (20 days with David Bishop & Dion Hobcroft Ė Limit 12
      VENT offers nearly 140 tours to over 100 land-based destinations each year and is the largest tour company in the world specializing in birding and natural history.
    ...
    **..Qinghai Birdwatching Trip, May/June 2003 - with Jesper Hornskov
      Situated in western China, Qinghai is the ideal place to see a mix of Central Asian specialities, Chinese/Tibetan endemics, and isolated populations of otherwise mostly Siberian species. In zoogeographic terms we will be visiting the Tibetan Plateau and its eastern fringes, with the latter showing particularly strong affinities with the least accessible parts of neighbouring Sichuan Province, known for its    avifaunally rich Panda reserves. 

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Eco-Lodges

See DISCLAIMER


Bull-headed Shrike - Photo copyright Naoto Kittagawa
Photo copyright Naoto Kittagawa
    The Wanglang Forest Lodge - The Wangland Nature Reserve in
      Sichuan Province has recently established a very comfortable eco-lodge,with assistance from WWF, the conservation organization. The lodge is open in all seasons, but bring warm clothes, since it's 3000 meters above sea level. Profits from eco-toursim in Wanglang are used to support anti-poaching patrols and habitat management. The web site gives contact information, but this very new lodge is not yet on nature tour itineraries, so you will need to find your way there!

 

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Endemics and Specialities

in China

Blue Eared Pheasant - Photo copyright Barry Koffler
Photo copyright Barry Koffler

Golden Pheasant - Photo copyright Berry Koffler

Photo copyright Beth Upton
 Information on endemics and specialities is derived from Sibley & Monroe checklists and bird distribution lists in Thayer's Birder's Diary - Version 2.05, supplemented by material found in Where to watch birds in Asia  - by Nigel Wheatley. Asian speciality birds, while not endemic, are those that can only be found in three or less countries of Asia. Information on endangered birds is derived from the IUCN Red List, Birdlife International.  The endemic, endangered and speciality birds may be uncommon, extremely rare vagrants, may be extirpated in the country now or may only be present in migration. However, documented sightings of each species noted below have been made in China.  Chinese Crested Tern - ENDANGERED - Courtesy of the Wildbird Federation of Taiwan - Photographer: Liang Chieh-tah
Photo courtesy of theWildbird
Federation of Taiwan
Photographer: Liang Chieh-tah
...
Endemics in China
(see also China Birding - Endemic Bird Species of China)
___ Ala Shan Redstart
___ Barred Laughingthrush
___ Cabot's Tragopan
___ Chestnut-throated Partridge
___ Chinese Grouse
___ Chinese Monal
___ Chinese Thrush
___ Elliot's Pheasant
___ Emei Leaf-Warbler
___ Emei Shan Liocichla
___ Gansu Leaf Warbler
___ Golden Pheasant
___ Golden-fronted Fulvetta
___ Grey-hooded Parrotbill
___ Hainan Leaf-Warbler
___ Hainan Peacock-Pheasant
___ Manchurian Paddyfield
___ Warbler
___ Rufous-tailed Babbler
___ Rusty-breasted Tit
___ Rusty-necklaced Partridge
___ Rusty-throated Parrotbill
___ Sichuan Partridge
___ Sichuan Warbler
___ Sichuan Wood-Owl
___ Snowy-cheeked 
___ Laughingthrush
___ Slaty Bunting
___ Songar Tit
___ Spectacled Parrotbill
___ Three-toed Parrotbill
___ Tibetan RoseFinch
___ Vaurie's Nightjar
___ White-browed Chinese
___ Warbler
___ White-eared Night-Heron
___ White-necklaced Partridge
___ White-necklaced Tit
___ White-speckled 
___ Laughingthrush
___ Xinjiang Ground-Jay
___ Yunnan Nuthatch
Endemics in China shared only with Tibet
___ Chinese Fulvetta
___ Crested Tit-Warbler
___ Elliot's Laughingthrush
___ Giant Laughingthrush
___ Pink-tailed Bunting
___ Sichuan Jay
___ Tibetan Babax
___ Tibetan Bunting
___ White-browed Tit
___ White Eared-Pheasant
Endangered Birds in China
(endemics are printed in bold italic)

Breeding Birds

Non-Breeding Birds

___ Baer's Pochard
___ Beautiful Nuthatch
___ Black-bellied Tern
___ Black-faced Spoonbill
___ Black-necked Crane
___ Black-throated Blue Robin
___ Blakiston's Fish-Owl
___ Blyth's Kingfisher
___ Blyth's Tragopan
___ Brown Eared-Pheasant
___ Brown-chested 
___ Jungle-Flycatcher
___ Cabot's Tragopan
___ Chestnut-breasted Partridge
___ Chinese Crested-Tern
___ Chinese Egret
___ Chinese Monal
___ Corn Crake
___ Crested Ibis
___ Crested Shelduck
___ Dalmation Pelican
___ Elliot's Pheasant
___ Emei Shan Liocichla
___ Fairy Pitta
___ Ferruginous Pochard
___ Giant Nuthatch
___ Golden-fronted Fulvetta
___ Great Bustard
___ Greater Spotted Eagle
___ Green Peafowl
___ Grey-hooded Parrotbill
___ Grey-sided Thrush
___ Hainan Leaf-Warbler
___ Hainan Partridge
___ Hooded Crane
___ Imperial Eagle
___ Lesser Kestrel
___ Long-billed Bush-Warbler
___ Marbled Teal
___ Marsh Grassbird
___ Mrs. Hume's Pheasant
___ Oriental Stork
___ Pale-backed Pigeon
___ Pale-capped Pigeon
___ Pallas's Fish-Eagle
___ Red-collared Woodpecker
___ Red-crowned Crane
___ Reeves's Pheasant
___ Rufous-backed Bunting
___ Rufous-headed Robin
___ Rufous-necked Hornbill
___ Rusty-bellied Shortwing
___ Rusty-throated Parrotbill
___ Saunder's Gull
___ Scaly-sided Merganser
___ Sclater's Monal
___ Short-tailed Albatross
___ Short-tailed Parrotbill
___ Sichuan Jay
___ Sichuan Partridge
___ Sichuan Wood-Owl
___ Sillem's Mountain-Finch
___ Silver Oriole
___ Snowy-cheeked 
___ Laughingthrush
___ Streaked Reed-Warbler
___ Swan Goose
___ Swinhoe's Rail
___ Tibetan Eared-Pheasant
___ Tibetan Rosefinch
___ Vaurie's Nightjar
___ Ward's Trogon
___ Western Tragopan
___ White Eared-Pheasant
___ White-bellied Heron
___ White-eared Night-Heron
___ White-headed Duck
___ White-naped Crane
___ White-necklaced Partridge
___ White-speckled 
___ Laughingthrush
___ White-shouldered Ibis
___ Wood Snipe
___ Xinjiang Ground-Jay
___ Yellow-billed Nuthatch
___ Yunnan Nuthatch
___ Baikal Teal
___ Christmas Island Frigatebird
___ Indian Skimmer
___ Japanese Night-Heron
___ Lesser Adjutant
___ Lesser White-fronted Goose
___ Nordmann's Greenshank
___ Red-breasted Goose
___ Spoonbill Sandpiper
___ Spot-billed Pelican
___ Stellar's Sea-Eagle
___ White-throated Bushchat
___ Yellow Bunting

Other Near-endemic Birds in China

China is such a huge country, with such a large bird list, that space constraints make it impossible to list all of the speciality birds. If you really want to know more, e-mail me or check Where to watch birds in Asia  - by Nigel Wheatley.)


___ Black-throated Blue Robin
___ Blue Eared-Pheasant
___ Brown Eared-Pheasant
___ Brown-cheeked
___ Laughingthrush
___ Crested Ibis
___ Hainan Partridge
___ Pink-rumped Snowfinch
___ Plain Laughingthrush
___ Reeve's Eared Pheasant
___ Rufous-headed Robin
___ Three-banded Rosefinch
___ Tibetan Eared-Pheasant
___ White-backed Thrush
___ White-rumped Snowfinch
___ Yellow-bellied Tit

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Weather and Best Birding

 Information obtained fromand
from Where to Watch Birds in Asia - by Nigel Wheatley.


Month Birding Conditions Beijing Shanghai
Maximum
Temperature 
F / C
Minimum Temperature
F/C
Rainfall 
(inches)
Maximum
Temperature 
F / C
Minimum Temperature
F/C
Rainfall 
(inches)
January ...
34.5/1.4
14.7/-9.6
0.2
46.0/7.8
32.0/0.0
1.8
February ...
39.6/4.2
19.4/-7.0
0.2
47.7/8.7
34.0/1.1
2.4
March ...
52.2/11.2
30.6/-0.8
0.3
55.4/13.0
40.3/4.6
3.3
April Good Birding
68.4/20.2
44.4/6.9
0.7
66.2/19.0
49.8/9.9
3.7
May Spring Migration/
Best Birding at Beidaihe
79.7/26.5
55.6/13.1
1.3
75.6/24.2
58.8/14.9
4.1
June Best Birding in Sichuan and Tibet
87.3/30.7
64.8/18.2
3.1
82.2/27.9
67.6/19.8
6.8
July ...
88.3/31/3
70.7/21.5
8.8
89.8/32.1
75.4/24.1
5.7
August ...
85.8/29.9
68.7/20.4
6.7
90.0/32.2
19.9/67.8
5.4
September Fall Migration at Beidaihe
78.8/26.0
57.7/14.3
2.3
82.2/27.9
56.8/13.8
5.4
October Fall Migration at
Beidaihe
67.3/19.6
44.4/6.9
0.7
73.4/23.0
46.0/7.8
2.7
November ...
50.2/10.1
30.7/-0.7
0.4
62.4/16.9
36.0/2.2
2.1
December ...
64.2/17.9
19.0/-7.2
0.1
51.4/10.8
36.0/2.2
1.5
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Print and Other Resources on Birds

and Birding in China

(logos and links take you to on-line locations where you can order/purchase these resources)
....
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A small portion of your purchase price for any books purchased by following links from this site will go toward supporting the maintenance and development costs of this site.
River Terns - Photo copyright Clement Francis and Vijaykumar Thondaman
Photo copyright Clement Francis and Vijaykumar Thondaman

Lesser Whistling Duck - Photo copyright Soon-Chye Ng

Photo copyright Soon-Chye Ng
    ....A Field Guide to the Birds of China - by John MacKinnon, Karen
      Phillipps (Illustrator), Fen-Qi He. April, 2000. This is the first truly comprehensive, taxonomically modern, and fully illustrated field guide to Chinese birds. Over 1300 species are illustrated in 128 color paintings, and they are fully described in the text. Color distribution maps are also provided for all illustrated species. The authors have both lived and worked in the region for many years, and they have extensive experience writing and illustrating bird guides. 
    ...
    ....Where to watch birds in Asia  - by Nigel Wheatley. covers the best
      birdwatching sites in Asia, with 26 pages dedicated to China.
    ...
    ....Birds of China - by by Xu Weishu, Wang Binyang (Illustrator), Zhou
      Lifang (Translator), and Liu Bingwen (Translator). The author, Xu Weishu, is a member of the executive council of the Chinese Society of Ornithology and its deputy secretary-general. His vivid and interesting account of the variety, distribution and habits of China's birds is complemented by nearly a hundred colour photographs. The book will prove rewarding for the general reader as well as bird specialists. 
    ...
    ....A Field Guide to the Birds of South East Asia - by Martin Woodcock,
      E. Dickinson, Ben F. King. 
    ...
    ....Eastern Rarities: The Birds of Beidaihe - from Peregrine Video. 
      Narrated by Bill Oddie. VHS. This video takes a look at rare birds as they migrate through the Chinese town of Beidaihe, which is firmly established as THE place to see Siberian birds on migration. The video covers 138 species, including 35 species of waders and is 2 hours 13 minutes in length. 

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